Virtual Affiliate Fellowship


The Kansas African Studies Center (KASC) at the University of Kansas, USA is accepting proposals for the KASC African Affiliate Fellowship for the Fall 2023 semester. The fellow will receive official KU affiliate status which will grant them remote access to KU Libraries and other digital resources. In addition, the fellow will receive an honorarium of USD $250 for a virtual presentation or exhibition of their work. KASC will highlight this presentation during the fellowship term and then archive it a gallery on the KASC website.  Although the topic of scholarship and research is open, KASC especially welcomes proposals related to our annual theme of Migration, Identity, and Citizenship. The fellowship is open to educators and researchers at any university in the Africa region. To apply for the fellowship, please send a CV and a 500-word explanation of your interest in being a KU affiliate to kasc@ku.edu by the deadline of September 8, 2023.  

Imani Sanga Headshot

Spring 2024 Fellow


Imani Sanga
Professor of Music in the Department of Creative Arts at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

I am Imani Sanga, Professor of Music in the Department of Creative Arts at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.  I hold a PhD (Music) from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, an MA (Development Studies) and a BA (Music) from the University of Dar es Salaam. My areas of expertise include the music of Tanzania, church music, popular music, music mobility, aesthetics and philosophy of the arts, cultural theory and the use of music in Swahili literature. I served as Head of Department of Fine and Performing Arts (now Department of Creative Arts) at the University of Dar es Salaam (2012-2015) and later Deputy Principal of the College of Humanities (2015-2016). Currently, I coordinate postgraduate studies in the Department of Creative Arts overseeing the MA and PhD programs in Fine Arts, Music and Theatre Arts. I am an active member of International Musicological Society (IMS), serving as a member of its Board of Directors. I am also a member and Tanzania Liaison Officer of the International Council for Traditions of Music and Dance (ICTMD). My research work on Muziki wa Injili (Tanzanian Popular Church Music), Postcolonial Soundscapes, and the Sonification of Swahili Literature has been generously supported by the following fellowships: African Scholars Program (2007), African Humanities Program (2009), and National Humanities Center (2019-2020). And now I am delighted to be selected as the spring 2024 KASC African Virtual Affiliate Fellow through which I continue work on my book project on Travelling Sounds.

 

At the University of Dar es Salaam where I have worked since 2001, I have taught courses ranging from Fundamentals of Music, Composing for Film and Instrumental Instruction (Brass) to Aesthetics and Philosophy of the Arts and African Musicology. I also conduct and arrange music for the University of Dar es Salaam Choir and the University of Dar es Salaam Band.

The book project that I will be working on during the fellowship period entitled Travelling Sounds: Afro-Nativist Discourse, Nomadic Praxis and the Music of Tanzania focuses on both discourses and practices of music migrations in Tanzania. The first part of this book is a critical reading of musicological arguments concerning music migration in Africa and Tanzania in particular. It identifies various short-circuits and antinomies in the arguments for the inclusion and/or exclusion of various musical styles or traditions in what is considered to be African music on the basis of the music’s origins and general characteristics.  The readings also offer a critique of what I call sub-Saharocentrism in these strands of African musicology. By sub-Saharocentrism I refer to the widespread tendency of defining the music of Africa in terms of the music of sub-Saharan Africa and hence excluding the music of North Africa. In other words, the music of the Sub-Saharan Africa is often used a yardstick for establishing the degree of Africannes of various musical sounds in the continent. It follows that musical forms or traditions that either have their origins from elsewhere in the world or combine influences from other parts of the world are eschewed as “foreign” to Africa or as not fully “authentically” African. The texts analyzed in this section of the book include Kwabena J.H. Nketia’s The Music of Africa, Gerhard Kubik’s Theory of African Music (Volumes 1 and 2) as well as two book chapters namely “Africa: Ewe, Mande, Dagbamba, Shona, BaAka”  by David Locke and “The Music of Sub-Saharan Africa” by Thomas Turino. The other texts examined focus on East African music cultures, i.e. Stephen Mbunga’s Church Law and Bantu Music: Ecclesiastical Documents and Law on Sacred Music as Applied to Bantu Music and Arthur Morris Jones’s essay entitled “Musical Study of Swahili Epic Poetry” concerning a poetic tradition in East African coast called utenzi. The various chapters in this section contests the sub-Saharocentric perspective and advocates for a more pluralistic and a more inclusive idea of the music of Africa, one that is not founded on musical, cultural or racial homogeneity. It advocates for an idea of the music of Africa which recognizes the heterogeneity of origins of music and multiplicity of musical styles and the varied mobile experiences and the resulting musical transformations and hybridizations. It advocates for an idea of the music of Africa which recognizes the belonging of both the music of the music of sub-Saharan Africa and that of North Africa as well as African contemporary musical forms that are influenced by other music cultures around the world.

 

The second part of book discusses selected cases of musical mobilities and the resulting metamorphosis. Specifically, it focuses on selected travelling musicians, songs, musical instruments, and music genres. By analyzing ethnographic observations and interviews with musicians and by examining the music and written documents concerning these travelling musicians, songs, musical instruments and music genres the book discusses the travelling process and highlights the various transformations these musical entities undergo during and through the travelling process. It examines the resulting hybrid sound in their new locales in Tanzania. It also shows how ideologies, identities and social relations as well as politico-economic conditions of various places in the journey and in their points of arrival affect these traveling musical entities. A number of musical forms are examined in this book including church music, secular muziki wa dansi, coastal oriented taarab music, i.e. music that draws some influences from Arabic musical world, hip hop and bongo fleva, i.e. music that draws influences from the Americas and from other African countries such as Nigeria and South Africa as well as varius form of traditional dances or ngoma that is currently being staged by urban cultural troupes. With these cases, the book develops a critique of what I call the Afro-nativist discourse by showing that these music forms are not only products of migrations, hybridization and metamorphosis but also that they continue to travel, hybridize and change even today.

 

 

My research work over the years has been published in various journals in different academic areas such as musicology and ethnomusicology, popular music and cultural studies, African studies and literature. I have published encyclopedia entries concerning the music of Tanzania, book reviews and a song book comprising my arrangements of Tanzanian folk songs for church use.  Below I list journal articles that I have published so far. These articles can be accessed through the journals’ websites and at my academia webpage:https://udsm.academia.edu/ImaniSanga

 

  1. Sanga, Imani. 2020a. Musical Figures of Enslavement and Resistance in Semzaba’s Kiswahili Play Tendehogo. African Studies 79(3): 323-338.
  2. Sanga, Imani. 2020b. Musical Figuring of Dar es Salaam Urban Marginality in Mbogo‘s Swahili Novel Watoto wa Maman’tilie.  Journal of Literary Studies 36(2): 67-84
  3. Sanga, Imani. 2019. Sonic Figures of Heroism and the 1891 Hehe-German War in Mulokozi’s Novel Ngome ya Mianzi. Journal of Postcolonial Writing 55(5): 698-709.
  4. Sanga, Imani. 2018a. The Antinomies of Transgressive Gender Acts in Professor Jay’s Rap Music Video “Zali la Mentali” in Tanzania. Journal of Literary Studies 34(1): 104—117.
  5. Sanga, Imani. 2018b. Musical Figures and the Figuring of Tanzania’s Social Life in the Poems of Kulikoyela K. Kahigi. Journal of Postcolonial Writing54(2): 214—225
  6. Sanga, Imani. 2017a. Musical Figures and the Archiving of African Identity in Selected Poems in Tanzania: Reading Mulokozi’s “Wimbo Uliosahaulika” and Kezilahabi’s “Ngoma ya Kimya”. Critical Arts 31(4): 53—68.
  7. Sanga, Imani. 2017b. Antinomies of African Aesthetics and the Impulses of Aesthetic Relativism: Reading P‘Bitek, Abiodun and Agawu. African Identities 15 (3): 310—323.
  8. Sanga, Imani. 2016. The Archiving of Siti Binti Saad and Her Engagement with the Music Industry in Shaaban Robert’s Wasifu wa Siti Binti Saad. Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies 2 (1-2): 34—44.
  9. Sanga, Imani. 2015. Marimba and Musical Figuring of Desire and Postcolonial National Identity in Semzaba’s Novel Marimba ya Majaliwa. IRASM: International Review of the Aesthetics andSociology of Music 46 (2): 401—421.
  10. Sanga, Imani. 2014. Postcolonial Archival Feverand the Musical Archiving of African Identity in Selected Paintings by Elias Jengo. Journal of African Cultural Studies 26(2): 140—154.
  11. Sanga, Imani.2013a. The Figuring of Postcolonial Urban Segmentarity and Marginality in Bongo Fleva Music in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. IRASM: International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 44(2): 385—405.
  12. Sanga, Imani. 2013b. The Limits and Ambivalences of Postcolonial Consciousness in Mbunga’s Church Law and Bantu Music. Yearbook of Traditional Music 45: 125141.
  13. Sanga, Imani. 2011a. Music and the Regulatory Regimes of Gender and Sexuality in Tanzania. Journal of Popular Music and Society 34(5): 351—368.
  14. Sanga, Imani. 2011b. Mzungu Kichaa and the Figuring of Identity in Bongo Fleva Music in Tanzania. IRASM: International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 42 (1): 189—208.
  15. Sanga, Imani. 2010a. Postcolonial Cosmopolitan Music in Dar es Salaam: Dr. Remmy Ongala and the Traveling Sounds. African Studies Review 53(3): 61—76.     
  16. Sanga, Imani. 2010b. The Practice and Politics of Hybrid Soundscapes in Muziki wa Injili in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Journal of African Cultural Studies 22(2): 145—156.
  17. Sanga, Imani. 2009. Teaching-learning Processes in Muziki wa Injili in Dar es Salaam. African Music8(3): 132—143.
  18. Sanga, Imani. 2008. Music and Nationalism in Tanzania: Dynamics of National Space in Muziki wa Injili in Dar es Salaam. Ethnomusicology 52(1): 52—84.
  19. Sanga, Imani. 2007. Gender in Church Music: Dynamics of Gendered Space in Muziki wa Injili in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Journal of Popular Music Studies 19(1): 59—91.
  20. Sanga, Imani. 2006a. Composition Processes in Popular Church Music in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Ethnomusicology Forum 15(2): 247—271.
  21. Sanga, Imani. 2006b. Kumpolo: Aesthetic Appreciation and Cultural Appropriation of Bird Sounds in Tanzania. Folklore 117(1): 97—102.

My research experiences include conducting ethnographic research among church musicians and secular popular musicians in Dar es Salaam. I have also done extensive research on the use of musical figures in Swahili literature. In addition, I have experience in composing, arranging music for orchestra, band and choir as well as conducting the University of Dar es Salaam choir and band.

I also have experience in teaching at the university level since 2001 when I was first employed as an assistant lecturer in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts (now Department of Creative Arts) at the University of Dar es Salaam. Other experiences include supervising postgraduate students, coordinating postgraduate programs in the department, serving as external examiner for universities in Uganda, Kenya, South Africa and Malawi, giving invited guest lectures at the Universities in USA, Colombia and Germany as well as giving keynote speeches and paper presentations at international conferences. Samples of a keynote lecture and performance of my song arrangements can be accessed through the following links:

 

1.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khlkq6ShYlg

A Keynote lecture delivered at the 6th Mashariki Literary and Cultural Conference 2023 held at Makerere University and organized by the Department of Literature. The title of the lecture is “Sonification of Decolonial Acts in Selected Swahili Novels by Adam Shafi: Vuta N’Kuvute and Kasri ya Mwinyi Fuad”.

 

2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvCsaFv4U-0

Performance of my orchestral arrangement of Tanzania’s national anthem “Mungu Ibariki Africa”. The song was composed y Enock Sontonga. It was performed by Dar  Choral Society and Orchestra  and conducted by Hekima Raymond.

Ismahan Headshot

Fall 2023 Fellow


Ismahan Soukeyna Diop
Associate Professor and a clinical psychologist at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop of Dakar

I grew up in Senegal from a Djiboutian mother and a Malian father. At the age of 18, I went to Paris to start my studies in psychology, at the Université Paris 5 René Descartes. In my third year, I chose to go to Manchester (UK)  for an exchange year and this experience changed the perspective I had from international psychology. I went back to Paris for my master’s degree and back to Senegal in 2008, right after having obtained it. In various internship positions, in public hospitals in France or UK, I saw how many avenues there were for research in the mimical applications of global theories for people from the migration settled in Western countries. Indeed, there was a need to try and capture the core of psychology, to model it in an adequate way to fit for people who were not Europeans. When I returned to Senegal and started to work as a psychologist, I was interested in the questions of femininity and motherhood, and as I was working as a psychotherapist in a gynecology Clinic, I decided to start my PHD on an extension of this topic. Since then, I have evolved in my practice in two directions:

  • Researching on African mythology to find symbolic representations of womanhood and femininity, to explain gender issues in African societies
  • Extracting symbolic representation of oral tradition to enrich psychotherapy ad make it culturally relevant.

I am an Associate Professor and a clinical psychologist at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop of Dakar, in the Department of Psychology. I have significantly contributed to the construction of the Psychology teaching program (courses, syllabi, recruitment) and the Department of Psychology itself, founded in January 2021.
After my doctoral thesis on the topic « Hysterectomy, mastectomy and women’s status in Senegal», I have published in the field of cross-cultural psychology and gender issues. My research focuses on the application of African tales and mythology in psychotherapy. I have created Tampsy Optoa (Tales and African Mythology Psychotherapy / Outil Psychosocial de Tradition Orale Africaine) and won the American Psychology Association PsychSolution Grant in December 2020, to expand my research, develop and distribute it in Senegal and worldwide. My current research focuses on the topic of indigenous psychology and the exploration of indigenous techniques in the understanding, conceptualization and practice of psychology, for afro descendant populations. I am particularly interested on the impact of social, cultural and mythological representation of womanhood, femininity, maternity and emancipation, on girls’ education, and women’s coping strategies, from the lens of decolonial feminist psychology.

 

Peer-reviewed papers:

  1. Diop, I. (2012). « Approche interculturelle de la dépression post-partum (Cross-cultural approach to postpartum depression)». Dialogue, 195(1), 127-137. Doi :10.3917/dia.195.0127.
  2. Diop, I. S, (2012). « Hystérectomie et relation mère-fille dans le contexte culturel sénégalais (Hysterectomy and mother-daughter relationship) », Psychopathologie africaine, vol. 36, no. 3, p. 269- 283. ISSN: 0033-314X
  3. Diop, I. S, (2022). « L’emprise maternelle peut-elle être favorisée par la culture ? (Can culture reinforce maternal enmeshment ?) », Annales de la Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines, no. 52/B 2022, p. 97- 110. ISSN: 0850-1254.

Books and book chapters:

  1. Diop, I. (2011). « 1. Le Sénégal. » in : Yolande Govindama éd., Temps et rites de passage: Naissance, enfance, culture et religion (pp. 21-39). Paris: Editions Karthala.
  2. Diop, I. S, (2017). « 6. Le rire nerveux en psychothérapie. (Nervous laughter in psychotherapy) » in: Babacar Mbaye Diop éd. L’esthétique du rire, Cahiers du Séminaire d’Esthétique (pp. 97-107). Presses Universitaires de Dakar.
  3. Diop, I. S, (2018). « La parole dans le processus thérapeutique. (The role of speaking in the psychotherapeutic process) » in: Babacar Mbaye Diop éd. L’esthétique de la parole, Cahiers du Séminaire d’Esthétique (pp. 67-76). Presses Universitaires de Dakar.
  4. Diop, I S., (2019), « African Mythology, Femininity, and Maternity. » Palgrave Macmillan, doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-24662-4
  5. Diop, I S., (2023), « Adornment, masquerade and African femininity. » Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN: 978- 3-031-28747-3
Puleng Segalo headshot

Spring 2023 Fellow


Puleng Segalo
Psychology Professor at the University of South Africa

Dr. Segalo's work

My work centers around historical trauma as a theme, I also look at issues of gender and I look at this using visual methodologies. I'm interested in the everydayness of gender trauma, I look at trauma, not as an individual experience only are limited to an individual experience. But I look at trauma as also a social experience as something that does not only affect the individual in isolation, but always at the same time. It's always in relation to other people as well. I challenge psychology in how we've always looked at the idea of trauma. Then I zoom in and specifically look at the gendered nature of trauma. I do this drawing on the South African experience, on the ways in which apartheid affected people in South Africa, but in particular, the ways in which it affected women in South Africa. Often when we look at the master narratives, it's all always the story or the narrative of how people were generally affected by apartheid, but also zooming in on the gruesome violations of apartheid in people's lives. But what we often don't pay attention to, isthe everydayness nature of how the brutal system affected people on the everyday and in particular women, how they were affected in their homes, how they were, their private spaces, were also affected by the brutal system, and how then the trauma manifested through these experiences that women encountered. Oftentimes in our theorizing, when in the ways in which we speak about trauma, we don't pay specific attention to the gender trauma of it, but also to look at the ways in which it shows itself in the everyday experiences of women, and the everyday experiences of people of color. I then go further to engage the ways in which often it's difficult to speech from, it's difficult to express some of the traumatic experiences that people go through.

In my work in my research, I draw from visual methodologies and in particular, I use embroidery as a method wherein women can come together in solidarity, and collectively engage and speak about their experiences of growing up during apartheid, but also to look at how one can recollect how we can draw from our memories to then make artworks that speaks to and that reflects on traumatic experiences of people. Embroidery then has assisted me to critique and engage the idea of trauma that but also to offer space and platform for women to express that which they otherwise would not be able to express. I go back to apartheid, I go back to the past, because the past influences the present, because it's the past experiences, that also determines or affects how people experience the present. I then draw also from decolonial framework and argue that visual methods such as embroidery actually serve as a decolonial lens that assist us to look at what we think of when we engage issues of epistemology and issues of ontology. So how do we come to know how do we make sense of the world? And how can we do this without limiting ourselves to the mainstream ways of knowledge production. I look at embroidery not only as a research method, but I also look at embroidery as an epistemological framework that women can use to make meaning of the world to reflect on the world, and to also critique and challenge some of the injustices that they experience in their everyday lives. I have shifted from looking at apartheid, to looking at the current issues and current challenges that women are experiencing in their everyday, but always, at the same time, acknowledging the role of history, acknowledging the role of the past, in how the present manifests itself in how people experience the world in the now. My work has also then also moved on, to look at the ways in which COVID has affected women.

 

AUT 2022 Fellow

Alhaji U. N’jai, PhD
Senior Scientist & Associate Professor at the University of Sierra Leone
Founder & Chief Strategist, Project 1808, Inc
Alhaji N'jai poses for a picture

I am a senior biomedical scientist, senior lecturer, and researcher in the Departments of Biological Sciences, Fourah Bay College and Departments of Microbiology, College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences at the University of Sierra Leone.  I am also the Founder and Chief Strategist of Project 1808, Inc, a US 501(c3) non-profit and Sierra Leone community base organization. I am a technical leader, thought leader, and scholar with broad research interests at the intersection of biomedical science (infectious disease, toxicology, immunology, genomics, systems biology), environmental science, One health, climate change, geography, African history, anthropology, indigenous African Knowledgebase systems, and sustainability. I uniquely combine the power of mind (technical mastery), power of people, and power of agility to drive big ideas and innovation from industry to academia and community.

At University of Sierra Leone, I teach immunology, microbiology, environmental science, epidemiology, toxicology, and research methods to under graduates, medical and graduate students. Apart from teaching, I supervise and mentor undergrad, graduate, and postdoctoral research locally in Sierra Leone. I also lead international research, collaborations, and mentoring as a Principal Investigator (PI) or Co-Principal Investigator (Co-PI) on various projects.  Since December 2014, I have led as a Co-PI Ebola control, epidemiological surveillance, and Action Against Infectious Diseases Emerging in Africa (A-IDEA) initiative in Sierra Leone that has resulted in:

I have also taught and led UW-Madison Global Health Institute (GHI) field course to Sierra Leone between 2012 to 2014, that played a major role in building global health competencies for students from the US and Sierra Leone (https://ghi.wisc.edu/tackling-ebola-on-many-fronts/). In 2019, together with UW-Madison Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center (METC) Toxicology graduate students designed a unique African centered toxicology course for students at University of Sierra Leone (https://madison.com/news/local/education/university/african-university-gets-course-on-pollution-problems-with-help-of-uw-grad-team/article_abeb47d6-ae72-5736-9cd1-f732952bb42c.html)

I am currently a senior technical advisor with the directorate of health securities and emergencies (DHSE) at Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MoHS) and a Co-PI for Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) Grand Challenges grant for strengthening surveillance and public health in Sierra Leone. In this regard, my work in partnership with MoHS is focused on, 1) building a system for tracking and reporting of mortalities in country, 2) system interoperability, 3) Acute Febrile Illness (AFI) surveillance for diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin, and 4) Acute Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (AVHF) surveillance for routine community seroprevalence studies to determine exposures and immunity(https://www.thepatrioticvanguard.com/sierra-leone-ministry-of-health-re…).  I am a PI for the Carnegie Mellon University-Africa (CMU Africa) inclusive digital transformation grant to leverage Artificial Intelligence (AI) and additive manufacturing to improve access to quality prosthetics and orthotics for amputees. I also PI and lead the UW-Madison Global Health Institute (GHI) Africa One Health Center that is expected to launch in April of 2023. I am also a Co-PI for a new Japan $2 billion government initiative to prep pandemic vaccines in 100 days (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03000-3)

Nationally, I chair the One Health Technical Working Group (TWG) Committee, bringing together technical persons from Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of the Environment, Ministry of Health and Sanitation, and the University (https://www.ayvnewspaper.com/ayv-news/sierra-leone-commemorates-interna…).  Sierra Leone has adopted the National One Health Platform in 2018 to enhance coordination and collaboration in preparedness and response to public health threats. I am the Managing Editor of the Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research (SLJBR) (https://salonemessengers.com/dr-alhaji-njai-appointed-managing-editor-of-the-sierra-leone-journal-of-biomedical-research-sljbr/), the only peer reviewed biomedical and public health journal (https://www.sljbr.org/index.php/sjbmr/index) in Sierra Leone indexed with African Journal Online (AJOL). I am also a member of the Sierra Leone Ethics and Scientific Research Committee (SLESRC) at the MoHS that is the national IRB and provide ethical clearance for all human subject studies conducted in Sierra Leone. I am a member of the college of experts at Africa Research Excellence Fund (AREF) reviewing research proposals for fellowships and mentoring postdocs from across Africa (https://www.africaresearchexcellencefund.org.uk/). I also serve as a postdoc mentor for International Network of Government Science Advice (INGSA)- Science Advice Skills Development Program (SASDP)(https://ingsa.org/chapters/ingsa-africa/activities/sasdp/)/(https://ingsa.org/).

 

As Founder and Chief Strategist of Project 1808, Inc. (http://www.project1808.org), a Madison Wisconsin based US Federal 501 (c3) non-profit organization and Sierra Leone Community based organization, I have been able to successfully build a wide moat of programs around health, environment, entrepreneurship, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) and Leadership, and the arts from our three fundamental pillars of education, community, and opportunities. From an initial 56 students in 2011, Project 1808, Inc. has now supported and trained over 700 students drawn from various primary and secondary schools in Koinadugu District. The School-Community-University Partnership Models developed for Project 1808 has resulted high success rates for students through the life cycle from primary to secondary school and university. Other highlights of programs include training and capacitating over 100 Ebola survivors in computers, tailoring, catering, and driving. Through disruptive innovation, diversity of ideas, leadership, volunteer support, and community empowerment, Project 1808 has been able to create impactful, meaningful, and sustainable programs for thriving communities in Sierra Leone. The three-day Science (#STEEEAM -Science Technology Engineering Environment Entrepreneurship Arts Mathematics) and Leadership festival (#SciLeadFest) organized by Project 1808 is now a national event in Sierra Leone. Annually, the SciLead has focused on small pointed and targeted activities that build #STEEEAM and leadership capacity among students, youths, and adults in the community:

Along with Project 1808, Inc. and partners, I am working on developing Koinadugu College, a model One Health focused college in Koinadugu District, Sierra Leone.  The college scheduled to officially launch this fall 2023 will be the first higher institution of learning in Koinadugu District.  Koinadugu College will uniquely offer integrated, skills training sessions at the certificate, diploma, and degree levels in the following core areas: Agriculture, Health, Environment, and Science and Engineering. An education at Koinadugu College would have a special emphasis in these core educational areas that align with our values of: Entrepreneurship, Global-mindedness, Leadership, Indigenous knowledge systems, and Sustainability. The nexus of practical, experiential, community-level skills training, and academics offered through Koinadugu College we envision will serve as an economic engine for the districts, change the face of the districts, foster creativity and innovation, nurture local talents and attract others globally, build national and international connections, address societal challenges, and ultimately improve lives. (https://isthmus.com/news/news/wisconsin-idea-reached-one-of-the-poorest-regions-in-sierra-leone/)

Finally, I am a trusted radio, TV, and newspaper social and political commentator and analyst on the issues affecting Sierra Leone and Africa. I write opinion pieces for local and international news media on issues ranging from social, environmental, health, and political economy of Sierra Leone and Africa. I am also regularly interviewed on local and international news media. From Ebola outbreak, August 2017 landslides to elections in Sierra Leone and Covid-19 pandemic, I have used my voice and news personality to educate, social mobilization, and bring hope to communities.  Some excerpts below:

 

 

 

Everlyne Rotich headshot

Spring 2022 Fellow


Everlyne Chepkemoi Nyangwaria Rotich
Senior Lecturer at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Moi University Kenya

My name is Dr. Everlyne Chepkemoi Nyangwaria Rotich Bsc.N (University of Eastern Africa, Baraton, Kenya), MSN/Midwifery (University of Nairobi Kenya), PhD (University of Cape Town, South Africa). I am currently a senior lecturer at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Moi University Kenya. I am the coordinator for Kansas University- Moi University collaboration and currently working together with KU colleagues on a COIL grant whereby we are doing virtual classroom with Moi University and Kansas University Midwifery graduate students. I am humbled having been selected as SPR 2022 KASC African Affiliate Fellow.

I have served at different capacities at Moi University including being founding chair department of Midwifery and Gender 2012-2015, School of nursing representative to graduate school, participated in development of various curricula at school of nursing and college of health sciences including, Master of Science Nursing (Maternal and Neonatal Health) curriculum, Bachelor of Science Nursing Curriculum Master of Medicine Reproductive health, Development and implementation of nursing and midwifery protocols, guidelines, courses and programs, particularly developed clinical midwifery protocols, Bachelor of Science in psychology curriculum.

I was raised as a child in a remote village where distance from home to the nearest health facility or school was over 10kms with no reliable transport and other basic amenities. Many women then in the neighborhood had their births at home attended to by traditional birth attendants or family member. Occasionally there were medical outreach programs in the nearby trading center. I walked to school barefoot. There was no piped water in the neighborhood, most families and institutions depended on boreholes and seasonal water sources.

The background stated above stimulated my passion for midwifery and supporting women to have a satisfying experience during pregnancy and childbirth. My pursuit to understand and support women to have a satisfying birth experience led me to utilize engaging approaches Appreciative Inquiry and Human Scale Development Model. The participatory nature of the Appreciative Inquiry and Human Scale Development framework promotes inclusion of consumers of the service (women) and the people who work in the area (midwives and health service managers), as they understand the environment and what is required for the system to perform optimally to build on what works well in the system (Guillen-Royo, 2010; Whitney & Trosten-Bloom, 2010). 

My PhD research “Development of Woman Centred Midwife-led Model of Care through Participatory Methods for the Uasin Gishu County Referral Hospital, Kenya” engaged women, midwives and health service managers in the development of UPENDO-S model. Acronym UPENDO-S represents: (U)User-friendliness, (P)Person (woman)-focused care, (E) Excellence in evidence-based practice, (N)Networking, (D)Dedicated supported midwives, (O)Organised care and (S) Supportive leadership. The term UPENDO means ‘love’ in the Swahili language.

 

FIGURE: UPENDO- S WHEEL (Rotich, E. C. (2020). Development of Woman-Centred Midwife-led Model of Care through Participatory Methods for the Uasin Gishu County Hospital, Kenya)

The model identified the main components for a satisfying fulfilling birth experience for both women and their care providers. User-friendliness recognizes personalised, responsive care, live and well mother and baby, efficiency and timeous service delivery, effective, responsive communication and compassionate, respectful care. Person (woman)-focused care considers women central to maternity services undergoing a normal physiological process and not illness. The woman’s individuality is embraced and personalised and responsive care provided. Understanding of the woman requires building of relationships and providing women with information to enable them to direct decisions on their care and support cultural sensitivity.

It entails excellence in evidence-based practises to ensuring continuity of care, achieving good maternal and neonatal outcomes, providing targeted responsive interventions and excellence in service provision. The model identifies networking, collaborations, formation of linkages and stakeholder engagement important. Recognizes importance of the involvement of the community and political leadership in decisions related to maternity care. The model identifies dedicated supported midwives educated with knowledge and skills, updates and supported and protected to maximise their skills as maternity care providers. The model recognizes competent midwives with clearly defined roles and responsibilities working within a supportive system with access to specialists to support them in case of need for referrals.  Through regulation, midwives can uphold professionalism and practice within defined professional codes of ethics and standards. It is also important that the midwives are well remunerated and deployed. It also proposes motivation and minimisation of frequent transfers of midwives and use of implementation of human resource policies and codes of ethics in managing issues related to human resource.

The model in addition delves in organisation of care that entails maintained infrastructure and essential departments, maintained clinical resources, improved hospital processes and effective systems, maintained health information systems and well-defined nature of service at the facility. Finally, this woman-centred midwife led care requires supportive leadership who are experienced focused, visionary/transformational with a capacity to make decisions. Such leaders participate in facilitative supervision, shared governance and embrace employee participation in decision-making.

My other research publications include:

  • Nthiga S., Rotich E., Yego F (2020). Birth preparedness and complications readiness among primigravid women attending antenatal clinic at a County Hospital in Kenya. Kenya Journal of nursing and midwifery 5 (2), 44-52
  • Mochama, R. S., Esamai, F., & Rotich, E. (2019). Outcomes for preterm babies during the neonatal period in Kisii teaching and referral hospital, Kenya. Global Journal of Health Sciences4(1), 1-10.
  • Rotich, E., &Wolvaardt, L. (2017). A descriptive study of the health information needs of Kenyan women in the first 6 weeks postpartum. BMC pregnancy and childbirth,17(1),1-8.
  • Getanda, A., & Nyangwaria-Rotich, E. C. (2017) THE SPECTRUM OF MIDWIFERY CARE.
  • Rotich E., Mbai I., Marete I., Bennasar V. M., Lelong B.A.  (2012). Being Homeless: Reasons for and Challenges Faced by Homeless Women in the Streets of Eldoret Town, Kenya. African Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health.

I have participated actively as reviewer of Abstracts for International Confederation of Midwives Conference to be Held in Bali in 2023 in 2022, Sub-Saharan Africa Faimer 2015-2018 and National Nurses Association Scientific Conferences 2004-2008. Article reviewer for African Journal of Midwifery and Women’s health 2008-2016, Editor of the procedure Manual for Nurses for the Nursing Council of Kenya 2008 and contributor to the maternal and new-born health chapters and Developed UNFPA and MAK FGM E-learning toolkit for Midwives 2016.

Additionally, I have participated in several workshops locally and internationally notable among them February 2022: Speaker at the International Conference on harmonization of Curriculum and training of Health Professionals held in Mombasa “Role of Counties in regulation and training of health care workers”, December 2021: Key Note Speech at the Annual Scientific Midwives Conference in Kakamega title “Invest in Midwives for Birth Equity in Kenya”; November 2021: Presentation of Step 10 on “Supportive Human Resource Policies” of the 12 steps to safe and Respectful Mother-Baby Family Maternity Care of International Childbirth Initiative; May 2021:  Key Note Speech at the International Interdisciplinary Research Conference Held at the University of Eastern Africa Baraton Title: “Exploring Solutions to Contemporary issues influencing the 21st century Social Fabric”; Key Note Speech at the Midwives Association of Kenya annual Scientific Conference in Kilifi Theme “Midwives Leading the Way in quality Care for Universal Health Coverage”; June 2017: Delegate Midwives Association of Kenya at the International Confederation of Midwives in the Triennial ICM Congress held Toronto Canada; December 2016: Poster Presentation on “State of Midwifery in Kenya” in Johannesburg, South Africa; October 2016: Hosted the launch of Midwives Association of Kenya in Eldoret, Kenya ; June 2015: Kenya Delegate at International Council of Nurses “Global citizen, Global Nursing” In Seoul Korea and Nov 2014: Key note speakers at the Kenya Progressive Nurses Association conference in Meru: Key Note Speech “Strengthening Nursing and Midwifery to achieve vision 2030”.

In addition to research activities, I have served at different capacities at Moi University including being founding chair department of Midwifery and Gender 2012-2015, School of nursing representative to graduate school, participated in development of various curricula at school of nursing and college of health sciences including, Master of Science Nursing (Maternal and Neonatal Health) curriculum, Bachelor of Science Nursing Curriculum Master of Medicine Reproductive health, Development and implementation of nursing and midwifery protocols, guidelines, courses and programs, particularly developed clinical midwifery protocols, Bachelor of Science in psychology curriculum.

My experience also spans in leadership and policy. I served as a County Executive Committee Member (regional minister) for the County Government of Uasin Gishu (Dec 2017- N0v 2022).  During my tenure I was able to implement key activities towards improving maternal and neonatal health and impact overall in health. Key achievements include construction, equipping and operationalization of health facilities, notably operationalization of theatre services and first ever 20 bed Intensive care unit by County Government of Uasin Gishu. Development of innovative measures to coordinate and handle emergencies, through establishment of a 24 hour call centre,  realized Improvement in Health indicators to include increase in skilled birth attendants from 67%in 2017 to 88% in 2021, proportion of fully immunized children from 75.4% in 2018 to 86.6% in 2021 and uptake of 4th antenatal care 40.2 % in 2018 to 51.5 % in 2021.Initiated measures to scale up NHIF and LINDA MAMA Rebates that realized an increase in rebates to health facilities from Kshs. 7,000,000 per annum in 2017 to over Kshs 100,000,000.00-year 2021. Guided Development of different policy documents for department of health County Government of Uasin Gishu, Initiated distribution of sanitary towels to schools in collaboration with the office of the First Lady County, Invested in development of human resource capacity initiatives,  Empowerment and development of different committees at the County Department of health, In ensuring service excellence, operational and organizational efficiency, improved quality of care, initiated measures to improve the coordination of health service delivery through,

As a CECM, I participated in development of different policy documents and guidelines for the Ministry of Health, and Council of Governors, including Kenya Health Financing Strategy 2020-2030;  Kenya Health Strategic Plan 2018-2023; Inter-Governmental Participation Agreement on implementation of Universal Health Coverage, Participated in Midterm Review of the Transforming Health Services funding programme with World Bank team, Chaired Health Care Financing, Leadership and Governance Committee of the County Executive Committee Members for Health Caucus at the Council of Governors, Co-chaired Health Care Financing Intergovernmental Technical Working Group, Representation of CECMs for Health Caucus in Reproductive maternal Newborn Child and Adolescent Health Technical Assistance Multi Donor Trust Fund (RMNCAH TA MDTF) advisory Group at world bank and Board Member AMPATH, chairperson Finance and Human Resource Committee.

Having served as Chairperson of the Nursing Council of Kenya between September 2010 to June 2015. Duties and responsibilities included: Providing oversight to the Nursing Council Nursing Council of Kenya in regulation of nursing and midwifery education and practice in Kenya, making provision for training and instruction of persons seeking registration or enrolment as nurses and midwives in Kenya, establishing and improving standards of all branches of the nursing profession and safeguard interests of all nurses in Kenya, Prescribing and Regulating syllabuses and instruction courses of training for persons seeking registration as nurses or midwives in Kenya, Directing and supervising the compilation and maintenance or registers, rolls and records for nurses in Kenya and Advising the Cabinet Secretary on matters concerning all aspects of nursing. Guided in the development of tools and systems towards cooperate Governance, competitive recruitment of CEO/registrar, institution of mechanisms for effective human resource management systems and structures, Development of strategic plan 2012-2017, Development of different syllabi including syllabi for Bsc. Nursing, and syllabi for Upgrading of KRCHN to Bsc. Midwifery. Developed tools for cost containment and risk management (audit, finance, procurement manuals) and Development and review of governance manuals (HRM manuals, legal and other instruments).

My passion is in maternal and newborn health and overarching passion towards provision of affordable, reliable, quality health services to all.

Dr. Karimi headshot

AUT 2021 Fellow


Dr. Peter Ndirangu Karimi
Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacy Practice of the University of Nairobi

I hold a PhD from the university of Nairobi in clinical pharmacy which was awarded in 2017. In addition, I have diverse knowledge in clinical and social sciences. To this end I hold a Mater of science in microbiology, Master of science in health economics, Master of Business administration, Master of clinical Pharmacy, Bachelor of Pharmacy and few diplomas.

I have taught in several universities in the last 20 years and currently I am a senior lecturer of clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice at the University of Nairobi Kenya. During my teaching career, I have published 51 articles in peer reviewed journals and supervised many postgraduate students.

Beside teaching, I have worked with several organizations in Kenya and other countries. Notable among them is the University of Rwanda and Kansas University. I have been involved in training vaccinology which is joint activity between the University of Nairobi and Kansas University since 2014.

Currently I am involved in several research activities in Kenya. My main areas of interest include drug therapy problems and health supply chain management. The main goal is to enhance the quality of life of patients through provision of safe and effective  medicines.. The findings of these activities will inform policy on how to facilitate uninterrupted supply of medicines to patients especially in public health facilities.

Sinnei, D.K., Karimi, P.N., Maru, S.M. et al. Evaluation of vaccine storage and distribution practices in rural healthcare facilities in Kenya. J of Pharm Policy and Pract 16, 25 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40545-023-00535-2

Degu A, Karimi PN, Opanga SA, Nyamu DG. Determinants of survival outcomes among esophageal cancer patients at a national referral hospital in Kenya. ChronicDis Transl Med. 2022;1‐9. doi:10.1002/cdt3.52

Fredrick Githinji , Shital M. Maru , Peter N. Karimi , Eugene Rutungwa, and Egide ayitare. Factors affecting provision of female family planning commodities in public health facilities in Kajiado county, Kenya. Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice (2022) 15:91.

Degu A, Karimi PN, Opanga SO, Nyamu DG. Survival outcomes among colorectal cancer patients at Kenyatta National Hospital: A retrospective cohort study. Cancer reports.2022; e1743.doi.10.1002/cnr2.1743

Monicah W. Karara, Faith Apolot Okalebo, Peter K. Ndirangu and Sylvia A. Opanga. Comparative Glycemic Control in Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Herbal and Conventional Glucose-Lowering Agents in Nairobi County, Kenya. Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research 19(2): 25-34, 2022

Degu A, Karimi PN, Opanga SA, Nyamu DG. Predictors of survival outcomes among patients with gastric cancer in a leading tertiary, teaching and referral hospital in Kenya. Cancer Med. 2022; 00:1-14. doi: 10.1002/ cam4.527

George Walukana, Shital Maru, Peter Karimi, Pierre Claver Kayumba Effect of Universal Health Coverage on the Availability of Medicines in Public Health Facilities in Kisumu County, in Kenya. Rwanda J Med Health Sci 2021;4(2): 269-280

 Anyona Johnson, Karimi Peter, Maru Shital. Inventory Management Practices and Supply Chain Performance of Antiretroviral Medicines in Public Hospitals in Nyamira County, Kenya, Rwanda J Med Health Sci 2021;4(2): 257-268.

 Karimi PW, Karimi PN, Wata DE. Adverse Drug Events and Predictors of One Year Survival among Adult Patients   with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in a Kenyan Tertiary Health Facility. J Cancer Sci Clin Onco,2   l 021; 8(1):102

Lucy Wanjiku Kanja, Peter Ndirangu Karimi, Shital Mahindra Maru, Pierre Claver Kayumba, Regis Hitimana. Factors that affect vaccines availability in public health facilities in Nairobi city county: a cross sectional study. Pan African Medical journal. 2021; 38:72[doi: 10.11604/pamj.2021.38.72.21580

Eunice Wangechi Muthuki, David Gitonga Nyamu, Peter Ndirangu Karimi. Adequacy of blood pressure control and management patterns among hypertensive adult patients attending a sub-county hospital in central Kenya: a cross-sectional study. Pan African Medical Journal, 2020;37:325. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.2020.37.325.25366

Charles M Kabiru; Peter N Karimi; David G Nyamu; Irene W Weru. Drug therapy problems and health related quality of life among patients with colorectal cancer in a Kenyan tertiary health facility. Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice:2021(27) 2;428- 434. DOI: 10.1177/1078155220971024.

P Wakoli, S Opanga, P Karimi. Effectiveness and safety of artemether lumefantrine in malaria treatment at a regional referral hospital in Kenya. Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety, 2021 (30) 430-430.

Norah K. Maore, Peter N. Karimi and Eric M. Guantai. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacteria Implicated in Neonatal Sepsis at Pumwani Maternity Hospital. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol. 23 (2020) 67-71.

Gathoni KC, Karimi PN, Weru IW. Drug therapy problems and clinical outcomes among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer on Trastuzumab-based therapy in a Kenyan Tertiary Health Facility. J Cancer Sci Clin Oncol, 2020. 6(1): 105.

Eunice W. Muthuki, David G. Nyamu, Peter N. Karimi, Kefa O. Bosire. Predictors of non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy in a rural health facility in Kenya Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther. 2020. 9(2): 34-38.

Ganatra N.1, Karimi P.N., Shital M., Kayumba C. Factors that affect the availability of medicines in public health facilities in Kenya: A case study of Nairobi City County. Vol. 24, No 3/ Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya / 2020

Gaceri P.G., Karimi P.N. Medication Related Problems in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers at Kenyatta National Hospital. Vol. 24, No 4/ Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya / 2020.

Musembi Y.W., Karimi P.N. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Urogenital Pathogens in a Kenyan Tertiary Health Facility Vol. 24, No 4/ Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya / 2020.

EW Njau, SA Opanga, PN Karimi. Prevalence and management of dyslipidemias in adult renal transplant recipients attending nephrology clinic at a Tertiary Hospital in Kenya Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety,2019 (28) 91-91.

Emmanuel M Mwengi, David G Nyamu, Peter M Njogu, Peter N Karimi. Antihypertensive therapy and adequacy of blood pressure control among adult hypertensive diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease in a tertiary referral hospital. Hospital practice, 2019.

Innocent M, Karimi PN, Nyamu DG and Maranga ISO: Efficacy and cost of granisetron versus ondansetron in the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients at Kenyatta National Hospital. Int J Pharm Sci Res 2018; 9(4): 1644-49. doi: 10.13040/IJPSR.0975-8232.9(4).1644-49.

A.W. Karita, D.G. Nyamu, P.N. Karimi, S.C. Gitau. Amphotericin B toxicities among HIV infected adults with Cryptococcal Meningitis in Kiambu District Hospital. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol. 23, No 4/ Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya / 2018. P 113-117

Ayan A. Magot, Peter N. Karimi, Eric M. Guantai , Shital M. Maru, and David G. Nyamu. Identification and characterization of potential drug interactions in hypertensive patients in a Kenyan tertiary hospital. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 7 No. 1 Pages 7-12, 2018.

P.N. Karimi, A.N. Guantai, C. Kigondu and T. Ogaro. Prevalence of adverse events of Anti tuberculosis drugs and their impact on adherence to treatment in Nairobi City County. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. 2017. Vol. 23 No. 2. 56-60.

P.N. Karimi, A.N. Guantai, C. Kigondu and T. Ogaro. Adverse Drug Reactions Among Patients Being Treated for Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Nairobi City County Health Facilities. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. 2017.Vol. 23 No. 2. 61-65.

Amsalu Degu, Peter Njogu, Irene Weru and Peter Karimi. Assessment of drug therapy problems among patients with cervical cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. Gynecologic Oncology Research and Practice (2017) 4:15DOI 10.1186/s40661-017- 0054-9.7.

E. K. Kituzi, P. N. Karimi, D. G. Nyamu and L. J. Tirop.Effect of Insulin Storage and Administration Methods on Long Term Glycaemic Control among Adult Diabetic Patients in a Kenyan Referral Hospital. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol. 19 (2016) 3-9.

C.K. Maina, P.N. Karimi, K. Mariita, D.G Nyamu, G.A Mugendi, S.A Opanga. Correlates and management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease in a Kenyan Tertiary Hospital. East African Medical Journal - Vol 93, No 10 (2016).

K. Mariita, G. Nyamu, C. K. Maina, P. N. Karimi, A. Mugendi and T. B. Menge. Patient associated factors that affect adherence to warfarin therapy in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Kenya. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.Vol. 18 (2015) 67-74.

Bichanga K.P, Karimi N.P, Guantai E.M. Adherence to National Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Malaria at the Kisii Teaching and Referral Hospital in Kenya. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol. 23 No. 1/2016.

Mwangi WW, Karimi P, Githinji C and Fatmah, Challenges in the pharmacological management of Non Hodgkins Lymphoma in children in the maintenance phase of therapy at Kenyatta National Hospital. J Cancer Sci Oncol 3(2): 207.doi: 10.15744/2394- 6520.3.207.

Winnie W. Mwangi, Peter Karimi, Apollo Maima, Charles Githinji, Abdallah Fatuma.Factors influencing the Management of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Children at Kenyatta National Hospital. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol. 23 No. 1/2016.

Aisha Mongi, David Nyamu, Peter Karimi, and Shital Maru. Evaluation of the management of hypertension among diabetic and non-diabetic adult outpatients at a referral hospital in Kenya. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 5 No. 2 Pages 93-99, 2016.

Kizito Mariita, David G Nyamu, Carol K Maina, Peter N Karimi, Tom B Menge. Patient factors impacting on oral anticoagulation therapy among adult outpatients in a Kenyan referral hospital. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Vol 5 No 3(2016).

Cecilia M. Wamalwa, Caroline N. Wafula, Peter N. Karimi, Kefa B. Ogonyo and George Wandolo. Factors that influence adequacy of asthma control in children residing in Naivasha, a flower growing area in Kenya. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 5. 4 Pages221-228, 2016. 8.

Lawrence M. Kimani,Peter N. Karimi, Sylvia A. Opanga and Kefa O. Bosire. Treatment of chronic heart failure in adults at a referral hospital in Kenya: adverse drug reactions and determinants of adherence. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 5 No.1 Pages 35-41, 2016.

Faith R Lulalire, Peter N Karimi, Evans M Mwagangi, George Wandolo. Effect of Magnesium Sulphate in Mothers suffering from Toxemia of Pregnancy and their Neonates. African journal of Pharmacology and therapeutics. Vol 5, No 2 (2016)

Mwai G.O.,Nyamu D.G.,Menge T.B., Karimi P.N. Prevalence and Preventive strategies of Nephrotoxicity in Patients receiving Cisplatin based regimen in a Kenyan Referral Hospital. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol. 22 No. 3/Dec. 2013.

Rugendo A.B., Karimi P.N. Amugune B.K., Maima A.O. Impact of medication related problems on individualized dispensing at Kenyatta National Hospital. The Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol. 22 No. 3 / Dec. 2015.

Nassali Huldha, Karimi Peter, Nyamu David, Guantai Eric, Maima Apollo O, Kajungu Dan, Kirui Jackson. Evaluation of prescribing practices at Kenyatta National Hospital. The pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol 22 No 2 pages 42-49, 2015.

Wasike C.N, Karimi P.N, Mwangangi E., Bosire K. Antibiotic prescribing for neonatal sepsis at Kisii Level 5 Hospital, Kenya. The pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya. Vol 22 No 2 pages 34-38, 2015.

Deogratias M. Katabalo, David G. Nyamu, Beatrice Amugune, Peter N. Karimi, Faith A. Okalebo, Kefa O. Bosire, and Gichuru Muriuki. Determinants of Adherence to Anticonvulsants Therapy among Outpatient Epileptic Children in a Kenyan Referral Hospital. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 4 No. 2 Pages 40-47, 2015.

Linet K. Elamenya Peter N. Karimi, Nasser Nyamweya, Caroline N. Wafula Faith A. Okalebo. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacteria that cause Wound Sepsis in the Paediatric Surgical Patients at Kenyatta National Hospital. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 4 No. 1 Pages 21-27, 2015

Caroline N. Wafula , Cecilia M. Wamalwa , Margaret Ambetsa , Linet Elamenya , Boniface Osano , Dalton Wamalwa , Faith A. Okalebo, Kefa O. Bosire, George Wandolo, and Peter N. Karimi. Effect of Pesticide Exposure on Serum Cholinesterase Levels among Asthmatic Children in Naivasha Sub-County, Kenya. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 4 No. 1 Pages 7-15, 2015 .9.

Nancy G. Nkonge, Sylvia A. Opanga , Eric M. Guantai and Peter N. Karimi, Knowledge of Correct Use among Hormonal Contraceptive Users in a Kenyan Referral Hospital. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 3 No. 4 Pages 105- 111, 2014.

Jackson K. Kirui , Raphael Ngure , Christine Bii , Peter N. Karimi , Charles Mutaie, and Beatrice K. Amugune.Combined Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Eucalyptus citriodora and Syzygium aromaticum Essential Oils. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Vol. 3 No. 1 Pages 29-37, 2014.

P.N. Karimi, J.M. Bururia, P.A. Odhiambo, B.K. Amugune, G.O. Museve. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae collected from patients with Wounds at Kenyatta National Hospital. The East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 12(2). p.42.2009.

P.N.Karimi, T.K. Ndungu, K.A.M. Kuria, J.M. Bururia,S.M Maru. Prescription Audit carried out at the Pharmacy Practice Centre of the University of Nairobi between June and November 2004. The East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 10 (2). p.50.2007.

J.M. Bururia, P.N. Kinyanjui, P.G. Waiyaki, S.M. Kariuki, P.N. Karimi. Plasmid Borne Resistance in Klebsiella isolates from Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi Kenya. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.2007.

P.N. Karimi, T.K. Ndungu, K.A.M. Kuria, J.M. Bururia,S.M. Maru, P.A Odhiambo. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus at the Kenyatta National Hospital. The East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 9 (3). p.74.2006.

In addition to research activities, I have served at different capacities at Moi University including being founding chair department of Midwifery and Gender 2012-2015, School of nursing representative to graduate school, participated in development of various curricula at school of nursing and college of health sciences including, Master of Science Nursing (Maternal and Neonatal Health) curriculum, Bachelor of Science Nursing Curriculum Master of Medicine Reproductive health, Development and implementation of nursing and midwifery protocols, guidelines, courses and programs, particularly developed clinical midwifery protocols, Bachelor of Science in psychology curriculum.

My experience also spans in leadership and policy. I served as a County Executive Committee Member (regional minister) for the County Government of Uasin Gishu (Dec 2017- N0v 2022).  During my tenure I was able to implement key activities towards improving maternal and neonatal health and impact overall in health. Key achievements include construction, equipping and operationalization of health facilities, notably operationalization of theatre services and first ever 20 bed Intensive care unit by County Government of Uasin Gishu. Development of innovative measures to coordinate and handle emergencies, through establishment of a 24 hour call centre,  realized Improvement in Health indicators to include increase in skilled birth attendants from 67%in 2017 to 88% in 2021, proportion of fully immunized children from 75.4% in 2018 to 86.6% in 2021 and uptake of 4th antenatal care 40.2 % in 2018 to 51.5 % in 2021.Initiated measures to scale up NHIF and LINDA MAMA Rebates that realized an increase in rebates to health facilities from Kshs. 7,000,000 per annum in 2017 to over Kshs 100,000,000.00-year 2021. Guided Development of different policy documents for department of health County Government of Uasin Gishu, Initiated distribution of sanitary towels to schools in collaboration with the office of the First Lady County, Invested in development of human resource capacity initiatives,  Empowerment and development of different committees at the County Department of health, In ensuring service excellence, operational and organizational efficiency, improved quality of care, initiated measures to improve the coordination of health service delivery through,

As a CECM, I participated in development of different policy documents and guidelines for the Ministry of Health, and Council of Governors, including Kenya Health Financing Strategy 2020-2030;  Kenya Health Strategic Plan 2018-2023; Inter-Governmental Participation Agreement on implementation of Universal Health Coverage, Participated in Midterm Review of the Transforming Health Services funding programme with World Bank team, Chaired Health Care Financing, Leadership and Governance Committee of the County Executive Committee Members for Health Caucus at the Council of Governors, Co-chaired Health Care Financing Intergovernmental Technical Working Group, Representation of CECMs for Health Caucus in Reproductive maternal Newborn Child and Adolescent Health Technical Assistance Multi Donor Trust Fund (RMNCAH TA MDTF) advisory Group at world bank and Board Member AMPATH, chairperson Finance and Human Resource Committee.

Having served as Chairperson of the Nursing Council of Kenya between September 2010 to June 2015. Duties and responsibilities included: Providing oversight to the Nursing Council Nursing Council of Kenya in regulation of nursing and midwifery education and practice in Kenya, making provision for training and instruction of persons seeking registration or enrolment as nurses and midwives in Kenya, establishing and improving standards of all branches of the nursing profession and safeguard interests of all nurses in Kenya, Prescribing and Regulating syllabuses and instruction courses of training for persons seeking registration as nurses or midwives in Kenya, Directing and supervising the compilation and maintenance or registers, rolls and records for nurses in Kenya and Advising the Cabinet Secretary on matters concerning all aspects of nursing. Guided in the development of tools and systems towards cooperate Governance, competitive recruitment of CEO/registrar, institution of mechanisms for effective human resource management systems and structures, Development of strategic plan 2012-2017, Development of different syllabi including syllabi for Bsc. Nursing, and syllabi for Upgrading of KRCHN to Bsc. Midwifery. Developed tools for cost containment and risk management (audit, finance, procurement manuals) and Development and review of governance manuals (HRM manuals, legal and other instruments).

My passion is in maternal and newborn health and overarching passion towards provision of affordable, reliable, quality health services to all.

Dr. Karimi's work