College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Featured Languages in Summer 2017

Arabic

Arabic

Arabic, one of the fastest growing languages, is a Semitic Language spoken widely across Africa, the Middle East, and the Arabic Peninsula. It is the key to understanding the culture and history of more than 22 nations and more than 280 million speakers. Arabic is also the liturgical language of more than a billion Muslims around the world, and it is one of the six official languages of the United Nations. The study of the Arabic language and Arab culture allows students to develop an appreciation for the complexity of the many facets of the Arab world: its society, culture, history, arts, religions, and literary heritage. 

Kiswahili

Kiswahili

Kiswahili is the most widely studied indigenous African language. It is spoken by various ethnic groups that inhabit several large stretches of the Indian Ocean coastline from southern Somalia to northern Mozambique, including the Comoros Islands. Up to 10 million people speak it as their native language, and over 130 million use it as either a first or second language in eastern and central Africa. Kiswahili is also a lingua franca of much of East Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is the national or official language of four nations, and it is the only language of African origin among the official working languages of the African Union. It is used in various international radio broadcasts such as the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), Voice of America (VOA), and Deutsche Welle (DW). It is also featured in popular films such as The Lion King and in cultural festivals like Kwanzaa. Kiswahili is taught in many academic institutions in the world from Japan in the East to Mexico in the West. 

 

Wolof

Wolof

Wolof is a West African language spoken mainly in Senegal, Gambia and southern Mauritania. The language has influenced the societies and economies of West Africans, and it has emerged through trade as a lingua franca also used in parts of Guinea, Guinea-Bissau and Mali. Wolof is known internationally through the popular work of acclaimed musicians and filmmakers. There are over 10 million speakers of Wolof in West Africa, France, the U.S., and other parts of the world.

 

Engage, Connect, Communicate



The Kansas African Studies Center has received $140,000 in funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to launch public discussions, community programming, and the creation of educational resources in local communities to discuss the challenges and opportunities surrounding recent demographic changes in the region. Visit www.migrationstories.ku.edu to learn more. 

Upcoming Events
"How does a dusty, working-class town in Georgia not only manage to rehome thousands of refugees, but make them... https://t.co/LwGdcI1IKP


48 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Pharmacy school No. 2 nationally for NIH funding
Hall Center receives 3rd NEH challenge grant to support humanities research collaboration
Regional leader in technology commercialization
12 graduate programs rank in top 10 nationally among public universities.
—U.S. News & World Report
Driving discovery, innovation, entrepreneurship
Home to 15 major research centers & state surveys
1st in nation for its special education master’s and doctorate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
1st in nation for its city management and urban policy master’s program.
—U.S. News & World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
KU Today