College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Home
  • KU to bring African culture to campus with film festival

KU to bring African culture to campus with film festival

Friday, April 12, 2013

LAWRENCE — The Kansas African Studies Center will host the University of Kansas' second-annual Africa World Documentary Film Festival (AWDFF) on campus next week.

The festival, which opens Wednesday, April 17, and runs through April 20, will feature 16 films submitted by directors from all over the world. Each film was selected to promote the knowledge and culture of the people of Africa in a Pan-African context.

Subjects explored in these films vary greatly, from the musical life of South African singer Miriam Makeba in “Mama Africa” to issues of housing and the law in “Dear Mandela.” One of the films, “My Mother’s Club,” directed by Kansas City filmmaker Rodney Thompson, centers on African-American women’s social clubs in Kansas City during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

KU is the sixth stop on this international traveling film festival, sponsored by the E. Desmond Lee Professorship in African/African American Studies, International Studies, and programs at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. The festival will leave Lawrence to move onto Kingston, Jamaica; Bellville, South Africa; and conclude in London.

The KU film selection committee was composed of doctoral students David Sutera and Zach Ingle in film and media studies, and Marwa Ghazali in anthropology, as well as Christina Lux, assistant director of the Kansas African Studies Center. Sponsors include Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, KU Libraries, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the University Honors Program, and multiple departments and programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Films will be screened in Wescoe 3139 and 3140 starting at 7 p.m. April 17. This event is free and open to the public. For the complete film schedule and trailers, check out the online program.


Migration Stories: Africans in Midwestern Communities


The Kansas African Studies Center has received $140,000 in funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to launch public discussions, community programming, and the creation of educational resources in local communities to discuss the challenges and opportunities surrounding recent demographic changes in the region. With close to 10,000 African immigrants living today in the heartland metropolitan centers of Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka, Emporia, Wichita and Garden City, a new project entitled “Migration Stories” will facilitate the sharing of migration stories about Africans within Midwestern communities. Visit www.migrationstories.ku.edu to learn more. 

Upcoming Events
This panel is set to start at 10:00 am this morning! Come and learn about interesting internship experiences from... https://t.co/LAB4OFZsQh


48 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Pharmacy school No. 2 nationally for NIH funding
Hall Center receives 3rd NEH challenge grant to support humanities research collaboration
Regional leader in technology commercialization
12 graduate programs rank in top 10 nationally among public universities.
—U.S. News & World Report
Driving discovery, innovation, entrepreneurship
Home to 15 major research centers & state surveys
1st in nation for its special education master’s and doctorate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
1st in nation for its city management and urban policy master’s program.
—U.S. News & World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
KU Today